WHY SPAY/NEUTER?

 

WHY SPAY?

There are many medical and behavioral benefits in having your female dog or cat spayed:

1. Better health for your pet
- Eliminates all the problems and potential risks involved in pregnancy and birth.
- Eliminates the fairly common problems of cancer of the uterus or pyometra as the pet ages.
- Greatly decreases the possibility of mammary tumors, especially if the spay occurs before the first heat cycle.

2. Decreases the overpopulation problem
- By not bringing more unwanted puppies and kittens into the world.
- Rids you of the worry of what to do with unplanned litters.

3. Eliminates sexual frustration
- Eliminates your pet's desire to roam in search of a mate, decreasing the problems involved in a free-roaming animal (car accidents, etc.).
- Lets your pet relax and enjoy being part of the family.

4. Convenience to owner
- Eliminates estrous or "heat" periods; no bloody discharge.
- Eliminates the scent that attracts annoying males.
- No need to confine your female while in heat, which can be costly as females in heat can be destructive in her attempts to gain freedom.
- Eliminates the frantic pacing and crying by the female while in heat (cats are especially vocal at this time).
- Reduced dog license fees each year will quickly cover the cost of the operation.

MYTHS


- Spaying will make my pet fat. Not true. Spaying your pet will not make her fat and lazy. Too much food and not enough exercise are the main causes of obesity.
- She should have one litter first. Not true. It is actually better for her NOT to have a litter or a heat period before being spayed, as the chance of reproductive cancers are greatly reduced.
- Spaying will hurt her. There is usually some discomfort the first day after the procedure. However, vets now have a "pain patch" the pet can wear home that relieves any discomfort. Even without the patch, most pets are hard to keep quiet rather than being "laid up" by the operation. What is more likely to hurt her is repeated parenthood.
- I will find homes for my puppies/kittens. Will you? Those requests for puppies or kittens often dry up when you actually have some available. Are you willing to care for all in the litter until you have placed them ALL in GOOD homes? Are you willing to guarantee their health and temperament? Or will some end up as "surplus" populating the local pound?

WHY NEUTER?

There are many medical and behavioral benefits in having your male dog or cat neutered:

1. Better health for your pet
- Eliminates your pet's desire to seek out a female and reduces the risks involved with a free-roaming animal (car accidents, etc.).
- Virtually eliminates the risk of prostate problems and eliminates the chance of testicular tumors.

2. Decreases the overpopulation problem
- One male running loose for just a few hours can impregnate many females, adding to the serious problem of unwanted puppies and kittens.

3. Eliminates sexual frustration
- A male sensing that a female in heat is nearby is single-minded: he will break down doors, jump fences and run in front of cars in his desire to mate.
- Lets your pet relax and enjoy being part of the family.

4. Convenience to owner
- Reduces aggression against other animals. It decreases fights, thus saving you expensive vetrinary bills and aggravation.
- Reduces the annoying and embarrassing urge of some male dogs to "mount" children and adults' legs.
- No need to confine your female while in heat, which can be costly as females in heat can be destructive in her attempts to gain freedom.
- Stops male dogs from "marking" and tomcats from "spraying" foul smelling urine in the house.
- Reduced dog license fees each year will quickly cover the cost of the operation.

MYTHS


- Neutering will make my pet fat. Not true. Neutering your pet will not make him fat and lazy. Too much food and not enough exercise are the main causes of obesity.
- Neutering will hurt him. There is little discomfort from this procedure, especially if done young. However, vets now have a "pain patch" the pet can wear home that relieves any discomfort. Even without the patch, most pets are hard to keep quiet rather than being "laid up" by the operation. What is more likely to hurt him is being left intact - due to increased cancer risks and risks of roaming.
- Neutering will take away the "guard dog" instincts. Not true. Neutering a dog does not reduce its ability as either a guard dog or a watch dog. They will still be as protective of their territory as they were before the surgery.

 

If you think you want to breed, please educate yourself first. The animals must always come first in any breeding endeavor. All genetic tests available must be performed on the parents before breeding takes place. And the individuals involved in breeding must be of excellent quality.

 


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